Me with my lovely wife, Kathy:

Monday, May 22, 2017

The Church, Messy As It Is, It's God's Plan, For Now, And For The Future

After a lifetime of pastoral ministry in a small town church, I'm called on to teach a class on theEcclesiology: after four decades +  of preaching, counseling, marrying, burying, weeping, rejoicing, seeing people leave for wonderful reasons--as in Great Commission--and dealing with others who left for all sorts of bad reasons, working through Mondays when I wanted to leave, and enjoying other times when I couldn't imagine ever doing anything else (obviously, the latter pretty much won), I need to figure how to incorporate that experience into a few class sessions, without allowing who I am to hijack what I'm tasked to do--actually teach ecclesiology, not talk about the old days. As I look back on my real-life experience, work through what I'm doing now--getting ready to teach a class at Pacific Islands University--and look forward to what is next--the second half of the class is eschatology (last things)--I find myself again thinking, "The church is this world's last best hope."
church and last things, some 8,000 miles from home.
As I was working on the syllabus for the class, my daughter-in-law, a pastor's wife, sent me this article. Especially, if you are part of the leadership of a church, I encourage you to read it.
http://www.desiringgod.org/articles/love-the-one-you-re-with (If you're old enough to remember the song, don't let the title discourage you.)
Ephesians 5 tells us that God's plan for the Bride of Christ, the church, is to make her a "church in all her glory, having no spot or wrinkle or any such thing; but that she would be holy and blameless" (Eph 5:27).  I can assure you, whether you look at the church as a worldwide entity, or you evaluate any local assembly of Christ-followers, she ain't there yet. Don't be discouraged, though. The Church is still the tool God is using to accomplish His purpose. She is an essential part of guiding this world, and each of us, to the destiny God has planned.
The Church: it's what God is doing in the here and now, leading to making all of creation what it ought to be. That's worth thinking about. If you can, I invite you to enroll as a student or auditor in THEO 302, June 26-August 11, Write me at the address below and I can get in touch with people who can help you do that. I know that for most of you, showing up in Mangilao Guam three times a week is going to be kind of hard. If you would like, though, I'll give you some reading you can do so you can study on your own. (Some of it will involve buying some books. Some will be handouts that I'll send you for free. Begin with the article linked below. It's part of my introduction.) If you are interested, send me a note at hmerrell@piu.edu.

Pray for your church, your pastor(s), the church; and I'd appreciate you praying for Pacific Islands University, and for me and my students as we work through THEO 302.



Love the One You’re With


In spite of a couple of horribly run-on sentences, no English teachers were actually harmed in the production of this blog post.

Saturday, May 6, 2017

Review of Roger Olson's book, The Essentials of Christian Thought


Roger Olson will be familiar to many readers through his blog on Patheos. This is where I came to know him. You can read more of his biographical data there. It will suffice to say here that Olson grew up in a staunchly Christian home, and kept what is best from that background. He describes himself as "a Christian theologian of the evangelical Baptist persuasion.  I am also a proud Arminian!  And I’m influenced by Pietism."  While I often disagree with Olson, I find his passion for ordering life and scholarship on a right understanding of the Bible refreshing.  When I read that his book on Christian thought was soon to be published (here), I was intrigued. I'm glad I purchased a copy, and I recommend it.

As a small town pastor, I didn't use the word "metaphysics" often, yet, in the way that Olson uses the word in Essentials, I was constantly dealing with the concept. "This book proposes to help especially Christians devoted to the Bible as God’s Word understand its implicit philosophy of reality— what is really real behind and beyond appearances. And it proposes to help them distinguish between the Bible’s implicit vision of reality and competing ones— some of which are sometimes even labeled “Christian” or “compatible with Christianity” (p, 9). Those of you who know my recent history will understand why Olson's secondary purpose intrigued me. "A secondary purpose of this book is to provide administrators and faculty members of Christian institutions of higher education with a relatively simple elucidation of the “faith” part of “faith-learning integration”— a central reason for such institutions’ existence" (p. 9). 

Olson frequently mentions a line from Alfred North Whitehead, "Christianity is a religion seeking a metaphysic. . . ." Olson is not alone in observing that over the past two millennia Christian thinkers have borrowed metaphysical systems from various schools of philosophy. Olson's contention is that while the Bible does not present a metaphysical system in a direct systematic way, the text of scripture is infused with a clear view of what ultimate reality is.

The thesis of this book is that, while philosophy can be helpful for answering questions the Bible does not answer, two considerations must be made. First, the Bible is not devoid of any metaphysical vision of ultimate reality; it implies one and that is easily discernable if one does not approach the Bible with a wrong assumption (e.g., that narrative cannot imply a metaphysic). Second, discerning that biblical metaphysic is a matter of looking behind the narrative at what it assumes about ultimate reality. There a clear vision of ultimate reality is apparent to any discerning reader looking for it. That clear biblical vision of ultimate reality is, as already expressed, the supernatural, personal (but not human) God of Israel and of Jesus Christ. . . . (p. 140-41)
In Essentials Olson points out where this borrowing has led to what he regards as pollution of the stream of Christian thought. Quoting from one of his "guides," Edmond La Beaume Cherbonnier, "aspects of extrabiblical philosophy have crept into and corrupted Christian theology over the centuries and still does so today" (pp. 88-89). Olson also briefly articulates his view of what the Bible presents as the ultimate view of reality. He compares this Biblical view with other popular views. And, though he denies that his is a book of apologetics, he upholds the Biblical view as superior over all the alternatives. In the later endeavor, Olson makes use of a word coined by Emil Brunner, "eristics." He gives a brief, practical definition on page 106, "[W]hen set alongside alternative worldviews, Christian philosophy is superior."

As pointed out at the beginning of this article, Olson is Arminian in his theology. Another of his books is Against Calvinism. As is to be expected, his Theological orientation comes through in Essentials. While those of a Calvinist persuasion will find some of Olson's thoughts along these lines troubling, perhaps even provoking, in the end, they are worth considering. Olson does not merely bluster about his Theological orientation, he raises thoughtful observations and questions. Even those of us who end up disagreeing with Olson concerning parts of his presentation will find ourselves sharper for the experience. I found Olson's book to be less a lecture, and more a long conversation over coffee. Not only did I find it intellectually stimulating, I enjoyed the read.
Toward the later part of the book a key theme began to be clear to me. Rather than try to put it in my words, I'll let Olson state it himself.
The biblical narrative . . . implies that God’s sovereignty . . . permits room for human free will as the power of alternative choice— the ability to do otherwise than God wishes. Everywhere God blames people for their sins, not himself. Their hardness of heart is their own doing, not God’s. Reason not only strains to accept the paradox offered up by divine determinists; it breaks apart when attempting to embrace both absolute, all-controlling divine sovereignty and human responsibility for sin. Also, extreme versions of God’s sovereignty such as divine determinism cannot avoid verging close to pantheism or what some philosophers call theopanism— the idea that God is all there really is; all is merely an extension of God. Without some degree of creaturely autonomy and freedom the ontological interval between God and creation so crucial to Christian metaphysics threatens to close. (p. 229)
. . . God’s freely chosen creation of free cocreators.  This is a paradox but not a contradiction.  It implies risk on God’s part. . . . this is all based on God’s voluntary self-limitation or self-restriction of power as explained earlier. . . . [T]he Bible and the best of Christian thought view history as an “unpredictable invention of two separate liberties bound together in a common enterprise.” (p. 231)
To interject a bit of my own musings for a moment, that concept of God taking a risk, exists at the far edge of my thinking about things Divine. Yet it is unmistakeable that such concepts--perhaps anthropomorphic, something Olson denies--do exist in Scripture. "Because of sin, then, human freedom must be understood as power of contrary choice granted by God in an act of awful love and risk— for the sake of fellowship" (p. 232). At this point Olson is close to Open Theism, a view that he in another place rejects. This is one of the "I need to think about this some more." points that abound in this book. It is one of the reasons that I plan to read it again.

I read the Kindle version of Essentials of Christian Thinking. I found it easy to read. The search feature in the Kindle version is useful. I don't know whether the print version has an index. The Kindle version does not. If my review is not sufficient to persuade you to purchase the book--something I find hard to believe--and you find yourself at a Christian bookstore, or you have opportunity to look at a friend's copy, I would encourage you to read the appendix (p. 235). It will enable you to see whether you want to read the book or not.

ZONDERVAN The Essentials of Christian Thought Copyright © 2017 by Roger E. Olson

Olson, Roger E.; Olson, Roger E.. The Essentials of Christian Thought: Seeing Reality through the Biblical Story. Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

Contents: 

Preface
Introduction: Why This Book

  1. Knowing Christianly: Seeing Reality through the Biblical Story Interlude 1 [Modernity/Postmodernity]
  2. Ultimate Reality Is Supernatural and Personal (But Not Human)
    Interlude 2 [Clearing up some misconceptions]
  3. The Biblical Vision of Ultimate Reality Retrieved
    Interlude 3 [Philosophy, Apologetics, Paradox]
  4. Non-Biblical, Non-Christian Views of Reality
    Interlude 4 [". . . the generic Greek philosophy of the educated elite of the Roman Empire . . . is the metaphysical philosophy that has most often and most profoundly influenced Christian thought"]
  5. The Biblical-Christian View of Ultimate Reality: God
    Interlude 5 ["If Yahweh God, the Lord, is ultimate, absolute reality upon which everything else, outside of God, is dependent, how can God be conditioned or limited in any way? How can the metaphysical ultimate reality be vulnerable?"] 
  6. The Biblical-Christian Perspective on the World
    Interlude 6 ["Has science replaced metaphysics in the modern world?"]
  7. Biblical-Christian Humanism
    Interlude 7 [Questions of Freedom and Sin]
  8. Appendix: A Model for the Integration of Faith and Learning



Saturday, January 21, 2017

Insuring the Citizens of "X"

(Normally, I'm not very political here. My intention today is not primarily to put forth a political position, but to encourage a civil, sensible conversation. No doubt the ruminations of my mythical king, and my thoughts that follow, leave much out. That's what the comment box is for. If the comments are civil, and based on sound thinking--not only emotion--I'll be glad to post them even if I disagree. After all there is the remote possibility that I could be wrong.)

Let us suppose that I am King of the Kingdom of X. The latest population census indicates that there are ten citizens in my kingdom. Six of my citizens are married. Two lovely couples are still childless. The other husband and wife have grown children who have gone out of our kingdom. They live in Y, Z, or somewhere. There is a widow and widower, lovely older folk. I won't be surprised to be asked to preside over another wedding. The grand matriarch of the kingdom is one-hundred and seventeen. She gave up mountain climbing last year. After she returns from a bike trek to the neighboring kingdoms, she will return to her job as librarian of the Kingdom. Some folk tell me she is getting to be a bit forgetful. Perhaps in five or ten years we'll need to build a nursing home for her.
Then there is Jack the Tenth. He drinks, a lot. He insists on riding his big Howard Davidson motorcycle without wearing a helmet. When he goes down the road there is more smoke that comes from his cigarette than from his bike. Sometimes he smokes some weed that he buys in the Kingdom of Colorado. He says it makes his rides prettier. The kingdom just bought its first ambulance, just in case.
As a benevolent sovereign I want to make sure that my subjects are well cared for, so I'm going to provide what the Kingdom of C calls Universal health care. My kingdom isn't rich--we are still making payments on that ambulance--so I have to figure out a way to pay for it.
My Royal Accountant tells me that we could easily cover eight of our citizens for $10/month. If they all pay. If we knew for sure that Sarah the Matriarch would die in her sleep at home, we could do the same for her, but, there is that nursing home. Then there is Jack the 10th.
"I'm consulting with Count Adrenaline of the Kingdom of Chaos, to come up with an estimate for him. It ain't gonna be cheap or pretty, though."
Bob, one of the young husbands in my kingdom is a sharp lad. He approached me the other day. He
wants to start an insurance company. He might even sell policies in Y & Z. He said for folk like Sam & Sally, the other young couple, he could provide complete coverage for $8/month including agreeing to pay for costs related to the birth of their child, which is about a sure thing. While we were talking the smell of burnt fuel and tobacco wafted through the window, accompanied by the roar of the Howie.
"Him? . . . wouldn't touch him with a ten-foot pencil, no matter how sharp."

OK, my fairy-tale has gone far enough. In the real world not only are the numbers of citizens far greater, the complexity of issues is exponentially greater. Having said that, though, can't we just admit that there are several elephants in the room.

  • Some people are a far greater risk than others. Much of that divide lines up with the divide of old and young.
  • If everyone is going to be insured, the healthy, at least for a time, are going to have to put more in the system, probably much more, than they take out.
  • If there is a government mandate--that means the government can punish you if you don't participate--then those who choose a healthy lifestyle are forced to subsidize those who live foolishfully, or dare I say it, "evil-ly."
  • For an insurance company to say I can insure these healthy, young people for $X, but if I include these unhealthy old people it will cost $X x Y, is not necessarily cruel or a sign of callousness. It is reality.
  • If there is a blanket mandate that anyone can sign up for insurance at anytime without consideration for pre-existing conditions, how is that different than allowing someone to buy a car insurance policy ten minutes after the wreck?
    Compassion and common sense have to have an intelligent conversation on this one.
  • Whether the coverage is single-payer, or as it used to be called "socialized medicine," or provided by businesses, the reality is, it is still a form of insurance. Somehow sufficient money must be collected to pay for what is spent for the care people need. Deciding whether government or business can do it best is a conversation that needs to take place. 
  • There is a limit to how much we can squeeze health-care providers. If fixing plumbing in bathrooms pays better than fixing the plumbing in our chests, guess which career the best and brightest will choose.
Our new President has already begun to "dismantle" the Affordable Care Act. The rhetoric is about to get deeper than the pile of bills one gets after a major surgery. It's important not only that we play nice, but that our conversation be governed by clear thinking.